Angling Blog 3rd April 2015

Fri 03 April 15

 

A crazy week this time, with a visit to the superb Northern Angling Show (where I picked up my new Sonik Sports SKS landing net!) which was a huge success despite torrential rain which made getting there quite difficult! I was pleased to see the show packed with anglers, and well supported by big brands (and smaller independents) with plenty of ‘celebrity’ on show; a fine addition to the packed show calendar which will only get better as each year passes. I managed to grab a chat with the editorial team at Carp-Talk which always offers a good insight into what is hot, (read my columns in the magazine every week!) I met up with a few old friends, made some new ones and saw some exciting offerings which are either already on the market, or coming soon! Watch out for Star-Flite stainless if you need some stylish bankware, check out FishEye cameras if you want to know what’s going on at the sharp end, and be prepared for some awesome new clothing from Fortis, the eyewear specialists! There was so much to see!

On the bank, I’ve been looking at the COG system which has been pioneered by Korda recently. The Centre Of Gravity lead, and the way they are attached, alters the mechanics of the rig, allegedly to provide a better hooking effect. I’m not really huge on rig mechanics, instead preferring to rely on a sharp hook and proper placement, but these do warrant further investigation… Some years ago, I completed a feature for Angling Times magazine at Alton Towers. Fishing the main lake in the shadow of the imposing ruins, a colleague and I enjoyed several hours sport using hot dog sausages and other baits to catch a number of pleasing fish. During the session, I witnessed a good sized common, firmly hooked in the bottom lip, using the usual six to eight inch length of hooklink and position of the weight to try and dislodge the hook… the important thing I noticed was that there was absolutely no indication at the alarm despite the fish spending a good five minutes with the hook in its mouth! Since then, I’ve always tried to use the shortest hooklink I can get away with…

Think about it; you only know you have a bite when the lead is moved (if using a clip system) and if the hooklink is eight inches long, that means the fish has a circle of SIXTEEN inches in which to move and try to shift the hook before you know anything about it! It might not sound impressive, but it offers an awful lot of leeway if your hookpoint is slightly blunted, the angle of the hook is off by a degree or two, or the fish is able to move to a snag? Having witnessed the clearly defined efforts of the big common to escape (it did by the way), I now try to use heavier leads, shorter links and, if possible, a running rig on a tight line to give me an indication at the earliest possible time. A four or six inch circle makes it much harder for a fish to move and eject the hook, and a running rig gives no opportunity to use the lead as a fulcrum, so must surely be better to use? The only disadvantage of the running rig that I can see is that the weight of the lead makes no difference to the hooking efficiency of the rig; there is no way the weight of the lead can prick the hook home, which is why I chose to look at the COG lead.

I like the idea of using the heaviest part of the lead to drive the hook home. Using the full weight of the lead at the earliest opportunity to force the point of the hook to bite does make sense and putting a recess into the midst of the lead is designed to do just that. It is the first time I’ve used them, so I’m still getting to grips with the concept, but the theory seems to hold water; a super short hooklink, perhaps with a pop up attached, will give the carp no chance to move off the lead before the hook point catches, so I’ll persevere for a bit to see what happens. I have found a glaring disadvantage though; what if the lead lands with the recess facing the lake bed? Surely that completely removes any advantage and really mucks up any presentation? So far, I’ve used them only in the margins, within a rod length of the bank, where I can see it so I know it’s fishing effectively. I like the look of them, I like the fact that I’m using the heaviest part of the weight to set.

I like the idea of using the heaviest part of the lead to drive the hook home. Using the full weight of the lead at the earliest opportunity to force the point of the hook to bite does make sense and putting a recess into the midst of the lead is designed to do just that. It is the first time I’ve used them, so I’m still getting to grips with the concept, but the theory seems to hold water; a super short hooklink, perhaps with a pop up attached, will give the carp no chance to move off the lead before the hook point catches, so I’ll persevere for a bit to see what happens. I have found a glaring disadvantage though; what if the lead lands with the recess facing the lake bed? Surely that completely removes any advantage and really mucks up any presentation? So far, I’ve used them only in the margins, within a rod length of the bank, where I can see it so I know it’s fishing effectively. I like the look of them, I like the fact that I’m using the heaviest part of the weight to set the hook, so I’ll give them a fair crack of the whip before I make a final decision…. watch this space….

Tight Lines

Clint walker

 

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